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Codicils  [message #70137] Mon, 24 August 2015 09:58 Go to next message
Kitzyma is currently offline  Kitzyma

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I see a couple of stories have had 'codicils' added.
A codicil is an addition or supplement that explains, modifies or revokes a will or part of a will. Having read the short story with a 'codicil', I couldn't find any mention of a will. Have I missed some oblique reference to a will in the story, or is the 'codicil' really an epilogue?
Re: Codicils  [message #70138 is a reply to message #70137] Mon, 24 August 2015 17:48 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Mark

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Well, according to Wikipedia, one of the definitions to the word "codicil" is "Any addition or appendix, such as a corollary to a theorem," which is what I'm assuming the context in which the authors in question are using.
Re: Codicils  [message #70139 is a reply to message #70137] Mon, 24 August 2015 19:29 Go to previous messageGo to next message
timmy

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Quote:
Kitzyma wrote on Mon, 24 August 2015 10:58I see a couple of stories have had 'codicils' added.
A codicil is an addition or supplement that explains, modifies or revokes a will or part of a will. Having read the short story with a 'codicil', I couldn't find any mention of a will. Have I missed some oblique reference to a will in the story, or is the 'codicil' really an epilogue?

--
I am simply following the author's naming intention.



Author of Queer Me! Halfway Between Flying and Crying - the true story of life for a gay boy in the Swinging Sixties in a British all male Public School
Re: Codicils  [message #70142 is a reply to message #70137] Tue, 25 August 2015 14:29 Go to previous messageGo to next message
dartagnon is currently offline  dartagnon

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Mark is right.  I just liked the sound of it better than epilog or after word or post script or (my original idea) easter egg.  These are just little vignettes that link between the various stories in order to bridge gaps in the overall story, pique some interest and generally stir the plot a bit.

Is it working?
Re: Codicils  [message #70145 is a reply to message #70138] Wed, 26 August 2015 09:57 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Kitzyma is currently offline  Kitzyma

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"Mark wrote on Mon, 24 August 2015 17:48"
Well, according to Wikipedia, one of the definitions to the word "codicil" is "Any addition or appendix, such as a corollary to a theorem," which is what I'm assuming the context in which the authors in question are using.

--

Even when used outside of the legal will sense, my understanding of the word 'codicil'  is that it means not just a simple addendum but an addition that modifies or amends in some way. Hence, in the wiki quote the example is a corollary, not just something extra added on. Perhaps in the  'codicil' to the short story I missed an aspect that was indeed an amendment or modification. In which case I apologise for choosing this as an example of a potential pitfall (inaccurate choice of words) that I, too, have fallen into.

Admittedly, it doesn't matter so much when choosing a chapter or episode title, and I'm certainly not getting at a particular author. I'm just using 'codicil' as an example of how important I think it is for words to be chosen carefully. e.g. If it's a vignette, why not call it a vignette?

Sometimes I'm tempted to choose a word because it may sound better or because I'm bored with a particular alternative word, but I try to resist the temptation because it isn't usually a great idea. Often, I don't succeed in resisting the temptation. So by bringing up this point I'm not criticising someone for doing what I myself often do - I'm just trying to raise awareness in fellow writers of a potential problem that we all face. Maybe 'codicil' sounds better than epilogue or postcript or afterword etc, but surely it's better to choose a word that is actually appropriate? An afterword is not the same as an epilogue, which is not the same as a postscript, just as a foreword is not the same as a prologue. Similarly, an addendum is not the same as a codicil.

Although words may not be a precise form of communication, they can be very nuanced. I feel that it is important for a writer to try to be a 'wordsmith' and use just the right word to convey the exact meaning or nuance.
e.g.  concern is not the same as worry, even though a thesaurus may list it as an alternative.
She was concerned when her son's grades began to get worse.
But
She was worried when she heard that her son had been involved in a car accident.
Of course, if a writer had deliberately chosen to use 'concerned' in that second example, he might have done so in order to convey something about the closeness (or lack thereof) of the mother/son relationship.

Yes, maybe I'm being pedantic, but words can be very powerful tools (e.g. see my post in the other forum). So I think it is part of a writer's craft to take care to use words as precisely as possible because the whole point of using words is to communicate. Not only does the correct word choice determine the accuracy of the sentence but the choice between words with nuanced differences can determine the emotive response of the reader.

As an aside...

Apart from the writing of stories, it's even more important to use words properly when communicating information such as in the news. e.g. I'm sick of hearing on BBC news nowadays that "The man was killed after the explosion (or car accident)". Who killed him and why?
Obviously, it should be either "he died after the explosion" or "he was killed in the explosion".

Also on BBC news, the use of 'alleged' or 'allegedly' is not only massively overused (presumably to minimise any possible risk of legal action) but, even worse, it's frequently misused.
"The man was arrested for allegedly stabbing the boy"
is not, as BBC news seem to think, the same as
"The man was arrested for the alleged stabbing of the boy"
Re: Codicils  [message #70148 is a reply to message #70145] Wed, 26 August 2015 15:30 Go to previous messageGo to next message
ChrisR is currently offline  ChrisR

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I'm pleased to see you write this about "killed after the explosion." I assumed it was just another Britishism I have to deal with on BBC. From your comment, it seems that it rather reverts to simply poor writing.

The "alleged" has reached its new zenith with the ISIS gang with stories of their films "allegedly" showing gruesome murders. They ARE showing gruesome murders. Get over it.

My worst bugaboo, however, is the universal acclamation that such-and-such a group "claimed responsibility" for some reprehensible action. What the bloody hell is "responsible" about heinous acts? Why doesn't the presenter say, "[insert terrorist group name here] acknowledged gross irresponsibility in the deaths of four children..." ???
Re: Codicils  [message #70150 is a reply to message #70148] Wed, 26 August 2015 17:56 Go to previous messageGo to next message
dartagnon is currently offline  dartagnon

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Dearest Kitzyma

I apologize for being American, an author, having free will, not necessarily agreeing with your point of view or for any of the other thousands of ways I've offended your delicate sensibilities.  If you so desire, I will change every word of every story I have ever written, despite writing being an art form which seeks to expand language, rather than contract it as might a barrister, lawyer or accountant.  If this further causes difficulty for your continued enjoying reading absolutely anything, I shall have my offending stories simply removed, from this site, forthwith.  I hope this has ended any unpleasantness, and I hope you have a splendid day.

Sincerely yours, D'Artagnon

P.S. : I do realize that my pseudonym is not spelled as it properly appears in the works of Alexandre Dumas.  To avoid confusion, this was done on purpose
Re: Codicils  [message #70151 is a reply to message #70150] Wed, 26 August 2015 18:06 Go to previous messageGo to next message
timmy

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Time for a saucer of cream anyone?

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Author of Queer Me! Halfway Between Flying and Crying - the true story of life for a gay boy in the Swinging Sixties in a British all male Public School
Re: Codicils  [message #70152 is a reply to message #70151] Wed, 26 August 2015 19:49 Go to previous messageGo to next message
timmy

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Location: UK, in Devon
Registered: February 2003
Messages: 13590



Now we're all drinking cream I just want to remind us all that different opinions are great things to have. I like it when we disagree.

The vital thing is for no-one involved in a disagreement to take offence.

Hold strong opinions and argue your corner as well as you are able. Never take nor give offence, and remember that words are, indeed, powerful.

I am aiming this message at no-one, or at everyone, or both.



Author of Queer Me! Halfway Between Flying and Crying - the true story of life for a gay boy in the Swinging Sixties in a British all male Public School
Re: Codicils  [message #70212 is a reply to message #70152] Wed, 16 September 2015 23:50 Go to previous message
The Gay Deceiver is currently offline  The Gay Deceiver

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Tee-hee, tee-hee, tee-hee...

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