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Digital Age of Consent  [message #70628] Tue, 15 December 2015 14:05 Go to next message
timmy   United Kingdom

Has no life at all
Location: UK, in Devon
Registered: February 2003
Messages: 12929



I have had to add a note to the footer of this forum because of this foolish material from the EU.

Yet another nanny-state stupidity

[Updated on: Tue, 15 December 2015 14:05]




Inconsistent use of capital letters is the difference between Bobby helping Uncle Jack off a horse, AND Bobby helping uncle jack off a horse!
Re: Digital Age of Consent  [message #70629 is a reply to message #70628] Tue, 15 December 2015 16:37 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Nick Deverill is currently offline  Nick Deverill   United Kingdom

Toe is in the water

Registered: November 2012
Messages: 83



I rather like the notice though. Quite correct to turn it about as the web operator could not possibly police the matter. After all, if one had to submit a scan of ones birth certificate to join a web site, it would still be only a check in spirit as altering a date on a scan ought to be well within the abilities of most 11 year olds.
Re: Digital Age of Consent  [message #70630 is a reply to message #70629] Tue, 15 December 2015 20:41 Go to previous messageGo to next message
The Gay Deceiver is currently offline  The Gay Deceiver   

Really getting into it
Location: Canada
Registered: December 2003
Messages: 892




During the late 70's and early 80's my Associates and I were convinced the next big growth industries (at that time) were going to be in the areas of Health-care and Governance... in essence protecting ourselves from ourselves. We were to soon witness Municipalities tearing down perfectly good and suitable playgrounds made of metal with firm edges and metal nuts and bolts, replacing them with plastics and rounded or smooth surfaces and little or no metal in their composition.  Sand was replace with saw-dust and chip-wood, teeter-totters fell by the wayside and swings all but disappeared with slides a forgotten memory.  This little endeavour cost Municipalities and us the taxpayer hundreds of millions.  Why?  You might ask... because a child might hurt him- or her-self and our generation of parents wouldn't want that, even though we had somehow survived the rigors and dangers of the local playground ourselves some 10- to 15, or maybe even 20-years earlier.  Similar nonsense had slowly been inflicted upon us across the board in just about every area of our lives, and our youngsters belief in their entitlement grew no bounds accordingly.

Today (and for the past 10-years or more perhaps) the big bug-a-boo has simply gotten to be the Internet.  Governments and other authorities are (and have been to a fault) falling all over themselves in the rush to find bigger and better ways to protect us, and our recent generations of children, from ourselves once more and the silly factories keep churning out more and more nonsense to alarm us into action.  That is not to say that some of what they have come up with is not worthy of our attention and our action; but, like the playgrounds of the 70's and the 80's proactive measures regarding the Internet can be taken too far, and I fear we are rapidly reaching that threshold, if not already having arrived there.

Warren C. E. Austin
The Gay Deceiver
Toronto, Canada

[Updated on: Wed, 16 December 2015 13:10]




"... comme recherché qu'un délice callipygian"
Re: Digital Age of Consent  [message #70631 is a reply to message #70630] Wed, 16 December 2015 00:53 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Mark   United States

Really getting into it
Location: Earth
Registered: April 2013
Messages: 837



Well, it's similar to a law here in the U.S. (that the article referenced) called the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act ("COPPA" for short), which dictates how website owners/operators can collect and store personal information about children under the age of 13.  On one hand, I realize that the people who support (and the governments that enact) such laws certainly mean well - after all, what's wrong about wanting to protect children?  But the one thing I've always had issue with on is how you'd actually be able to prove that the person you're communicating with is under the age of 13 (or 16, or whatever) to begin with?  As Nick noted, it's not like it's all that difficult for an 11 year old to grab an older sibling's birth certificate or driver's license and scan it in and pretend to be that individual, and as long as the kid doesn't slip up and give too much away in (a strictly text-based) conversation, most people would be none the wiser for it.
Re: Digital Age of Consent  [message #73614 is a reply to message #70628] Fri, 10 November 2017 23:41 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Boysarefree is currently offline  Boysarefree   United Kingdom

Getting started
Location: united kingdom
Registered: November 2017
Messages: 6



It is 13 to jin a social  network  site and 18 to look at porn or and do things sexually on the Internet  is 18
Re: Digital Age of Consent  [message #73615 is a reply to message #73614] Sat, 11 November 2017 00:20 Go to previous messageGo to next message
timmy   United Kingdom

Has no life at all
Location: UK, in Devon
Registered: February 2003
Messages: 12929



"Boysarefree wrote on Fri, 10 November 2017 23:41"
It is 13 to jin a social  network  site and 18 to look at porn or and do things sexually on the Internet  is 18

--
It is more complex than that, and is nation dependent. Whatver a sub 18 may do, you may not look at them unclothed, especially is you are over 18. In the UK you (and they) may not make pictures of sub 18s naked, unless married to that person, nor may they possess such pictures, Bizarrely this includes making pictures of themselves! One cannto, of course. be married to one's self



Inconsistent use of capital letters is the difference between Bobby helping Uncle Jack off a horse, AND Bobby helping uncle jack off a horse!
Re: Digital Age of Consent  [message #73617 is a reply to message #73615] Sat, 11 November 2017 03:12 Go to previous message
Mark   United States

Really getting into it
Location: Earth
Registered: April 2013
Messages: 837



Quote:
timmy wrote on Fri, 10 November 2017 17:20UK you (and they) may not make pictures of sub 18s naked, unless married to that person, nor may they possess such pictures, Bizarrely this includes making pictures of themselves!

--

It's similar over here in the U.S.  There's also been a lot of issues coming up surrounding it, especially since there have been more than a few news reports of teenagers under the age of 18 who are getting into trouble for "sexting" (sending sexually explicit pictures to others, usually via mobile phones, and where the images are often nude photos of the person sending the images in question).  Opponents of such actions obviously point out that transmitting nude pictures of people can either be easily considered child pornography (when at least one subject is under 18, even if that's also the same person who's taken, and is sending, the specific pictures) and/or providing pornography to a minor (if one or more recipients is under 18).

Others feel that at the very least society is overreacting and making punishments that far outweigh any crime that could arguably have occurred; there have been situations where someone under the age of 18 has taken pictures of their own private parts, only to wind up being charged as an adult - or at least have faced the risk of being charged as an adult - which means that they'd wind up facing such punishments as notable jail time ore having to be on the sex offenders list, possibly for life, along with people who have committed far more serious offenses (such as rape).

I read about one such situation a little while back.  A 16-year-old boy had left his mobile phone on the video record function while he, suffice to say, got it on with his 16-year-old girlfriend.  Even though the phone didn't capture any of it from a visual standpoint (you could hear what was going on, but that was it), when the boy's school found out, he was told that he might wind up having to register as a sex offender (even though the sex itself was legal, as it's often legal for 16-year-olds to have sex, as long as it's with someone the same age).  The boy wound up committing suicide a short time later.  There was an outcry locally, as the boy's parents weren't notified of the meeting until afterwards, and he also didn't have any legal representation at the time (and it turned out that he probably wouldn't have had to register as a sex offender at all as a result of there not being any visual images of the sex or nude images of either of the kids).
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