A Place of Safety
I expect simple behaviours here. Friendship, and love.
Any advice should be from the perspective of the person asking, not the person giving!
We have had to make new membership moderated to combat the huge number of spammers who register














You are here: Home > Forum > A Place of Safety > Literary Merit > The Navigator by Cynus
 () 1 Vote
icon14.gif The Navigator by Cynus  [message #73660] Fri, 24 November 2017 09:00 Go to next message
William King is currently offline  William King   France

Toe is in the water

Registered: October 2016
Messages: 75



This book takes you on a road trip that is different from the usual type of story, because it is a journey to be read on many levels. Throw into the mix an adventure plot worthy of any detective novel, and altogether you have an exciting, emotional tale, and one which is full of insights and reflections.

 We start this journey with the struggling musicians who befriend our protagonist as he joins them in moving from one gig to another. He becomes the navigator who shows them how to read a map and find their way. But Silas Drake is much more than a simple navigator, he is a boy cast adrift on his own journey of self-discovery and reconciliation. 

 "He was hurt sometime in his past, I mean, of course he was or he wouldn't be living on the streets, but it was more than that. He was hurt by people close to him, that he thought he could trust. He doesn't know yet that every performance is different," Those words express the struggle that Silas has with himself, a personal combat that spills over into the lives of those he meets.

 There is the discovery of a terrible secret and the overwhelming need to help the friends, who like Silas himself, have their own history to come to terms with. A history that may only truly be resolved by taking some risks. This ultimately leads to the final climax at the end of the novel, where like all good thrillers, the different threads of the story come together.

 If I have any criticisms, it would be that perhaps the character of the 'bad guy' all good thrillers have their bad guy is a little superficial. His actions are plainly laid out, but we never get any great insight into him. Then again, the book is not about him and his part is no more than a supporting role in the drama. I could easily recommend this book, it's a great read.

http://iomfats.org/storyshelf/hosted/cynus/the-navigator/01. html

[Updated on: Fri, 24 November 2017 09:02]

Re: The Navigator by Cynus  [message #73662 is a reply to message #73660] Sat, 25 November 2017 05:30 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Geron Kees is currently offline  Geron Kees   

Toe is in the water
Location: USA
Registered: February 2016
Messages: 49



"William King wrote on Fri, 24 November 2017 09:00"
This book takes you on a road trip that is different from the usual type of story, because it is a journey to be read on many levels. Throw into the mix an adventure plot worthy of any detective novel, and altogether you have an exciting, emotional tale, and one which is full of insights and reflections.

 We start this journey with the struggling musicians who befriend our protagonist as he joins them in moving from one gig to another. He becomes the navigator who shows them how to read a map and find their way. But Silas Drake is much more than a simple navigator, he is a boy cast adrift on his own journey of self-discovery and reconciliation. 

 "He was hurt sometime in his past, I mean, of course he was or he wouldn't be living on the streets, but it was more than that. He was hurt by people close to him, that he thought he could trust. He doesn't know yet that every performance is different," Those words express the struggle that Silas has with himself, a personal combat that spills over into the lives of those he meets.

 There is the discovery of a terrible secret and the overwhelming need to help the friends, who like Silas himself, have their own history to come to terms with. A history that may only truly be resolved by taking some risks. This ultimately leads to the final climax at the end of the novel, where like all good thrillers, the different threads of the story come together.

 If I have any criticisms, it would be that perhaps the character of the 'bad guy' all good thrillers have their bad guy is a little superficial. His actions are plainly laid out, but we never get any great insight into him. Then again, the book is not about him and his part is no more than a supporting role in the drama. I could easily recommend this book, it's a great read.

http://iomfats.org/storyshelf/hosted/cynus/the-navigator/01. html

--

Agree that chapter one looks most promising. But I have a feeling you peeked!
Re: The Navigator by Cynus  [message #73663 is a reply to message #73662] Sat, 25 November 2017 07:21 Go to previous messageGo to next message
timmy   United Kingdom

Has no life at all
Location: UK, in Devon
Registered: February 2003
Messages: 13227



"Geron Kees wrote on Sat, 25 November 2017 05:30"

"William King wrote on Fri, 24 November 2017 09:00"
This book takes you on a road trip that is different from the usual type of story, because it is a journey to be read on many levels. Throw into the mix an adventure plot worthy of any detective novel, and altogether you have an exciting, emotional tale, and one which is full of insights and reflections.

 We start this journey with the struggling musicians who befriend our protagonist as he joins them in moving from one gig to another. He becomes the navigator who shows them how to read a map and find their way. But Silas Drake is much more than a simple navigator, he is a boy cast adrift on his own journey of self-discovery and reconciliation. 

 "He was hurt sometime in his past, I mean, of course he was or he wouldn't be living on the streets, but it was more than that. He was hurt by people close to him, that he thought he could trust. He doesn't know yet that every performance is different," Those words express the struggle that Silas has with himself, a personal combat that spills over into the lives of those he meets.

 There is the discovery of a terrible secret and the overwhelming need to help the friends, who like Silas himself, have their own history to come to terms with. A history that may only truly be resolved by taking some risks. This ultimately leads to the final climax at the end of the novel, where like all good thrillers, the different threads of the story come together.

 If I have any criticisms, it would be that perhaps the character of the 'bad guy' all good thrillers have their bad guy is a little superficial. His actions are plainly laid out, but we never get any great insight into him. Then again, the book is not about him and his part is no more than a supporting role in the drama. I could easily recommend this book, it's a great read.

http://iomfats.org/storyshelf/hosted/cynus/the-navigator/01. html

--

Agree that chapter one looks most promising. But I have a feeling you peeked!

--
Well, we aren't the only site to have Cynus's work published. He's releasing his back catalogue here in an order of his choosing. What is really pleasing him is the quality of the feedback he is receiving by email from readers here.

What is really pleasing me is the quality of his work.



Inconsistent use of capital letters is the difference between Bobby helping Uncle Jack off a horse, AND Bobby helping uncle jack off a horse!
Re: The Navigator by Cynus  [message #73676 is a reply to message #73663] Thu, 30 November 2017 09:59 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Mark   United States

On fire!
Location: Earth
Registered: April 2013
Messages: 1111



It's shaping up to be a good story so far.  My only (admittedly very minor) nitpick is the method by which a youth joins the Order of the Arrow in Boy Scouts.  The OA doesn't approach potential members - the youth in question ("youth" being defined by the OA as those under the age of 21) is first approved by their Scoutmaster or Varsity coach (after meeting the necessary rank and camping requirements) and is then elected into the OA by the youth membership of their troop/Varsity team (thus making the OA the only notable organization in the world whose membership is actually determined by non-members).

https://oa-bsa.org/pages/content/membership-and-induction

[Updated on: Thu, 30 November 2017 10:03]

Re: The Navigator by Cynus  [message #73677 is a reply to message #73676] Thu, 30 November 2017 22:08 Go to previous message
Cynus is currently offline  Cynus   United States

Getting started
Location: Salt Lake City
Registered: September 2017
Messages: 19



I appreciate the information! I was misinformed as a boy scout, it seems. I wrote that part from my memory of what my scoutmasters told me, which I could've very easily misinterpreted, especially since I'm almost two decades removed from the singular conversation I ever had about the Order of the Arrow... Thanks for the clarification, and if I ever use the subject again I'll be sure to pay better attention. Smile



"Be or be not, there is no why." - Cynus
Previous Topic: Who is reading Rivers of the Dead
Next Topic: Sport, Occupation, and Pastime stories
Goto Forum: